Know Before You Go

Be a Plantwise Gardener:
Help Prevent the Spread of Invasive Plants & Insects

Select & Trade non-invasive plants for your garden. Access our Plantwise digital guide below.
Check the types of plants in wildflower mixes. They often contain invasives.
Remove invasive plants from your garden & property.
Dispose of invasive plants responsibly. Most cannot be composted or burned. Bag them securely.
Caution when moving or purchasing soil or mulch. It may contain invasive seeds or insects.
Ask LRISS for help to identify invasives in your garden & how to remove them.
Report any new invasives plants to LRISS.

Help Prevent the Spread of Invasive Plants & Animals

Remove plants, animals & mud from gear, trailer & boat.
Clean your gear before entering & leaving a lake, creek or river.
Drain the bilge, ballast, wells & buckets before you leave the area.
Dry equipment before launching into another body of water.
Dispose of unwanted bait in a sealed container.

Be a Responsible Pet Owner: Never let your pet loose into the “wild”

Return: Always check before you commit. Can you return your pet if it doesn’t work out?
Rehome: Find a new home for your pet through the SPCA, local animal shelter or private adoption.
Dispose: Properly dispose of aquarium plants or animals by freezing them and placing them in the household garbage. Never flush or release into a water body.

Help Prevent the Spread of Invasive Plants and Animals

Remove plants, animals & mud from boots, gear, pets & vehicle. 
Clean your gear before entering & leaving a trail or recreation area.
Stay on designated roads & trails.
Use Certified or local firewood.

Stop Invasive Species in Your Tracks

Remove plants, animals & mud from boots, gear, pets & vehicle.
Clean your gear before entering & leaving a trail or recreation area.
Stay on designated roads & trails.
Use Certified or local firewood.

Stop Invasive Species in Your Tracks

Remove plants, animals & mud from gear, bike & vehicle. 
Clean your gear before entering & leaving a trail or recreation area.
Stay on designated roads & trails.
Use Certified or local firewood.
 

Stop Invasive Species in Your Tracks

Remove plants, animals & mud from boots, gear, pets & vehicle. 
Clean your gear before entering & leaving a trail or recreation area.
Stay on designated roads & trails.
Use Certified or local firewood.

Work Clean Go     COME CLEAN. LEAVE CLEAN.

Help stop the spread of invasive plants and animals at work by using these simple steps: 

Arrive with clean gear & equipment.
Start work at the least infested site.
Avoid areas with invasive plants especially those in seed.
Use weed-free forage and gravel.
Leave with clean gear & equipment.

Prevent Invasive Species by Shopping Responsibly

Avoid shopping for pets and plants online. Shop & adopt locally.   
Inspect all packaging especially for invasive insects. Bag, freeze & report specimens.
Ask for non-invasive options at your local feed & garden stores.
Know where your online purchases are from. Choose local if possible.
Report any purchases that may have invasive plants or animal hitch-hikers.

Be Aware & Declare: Canadian Border Service Agency

All travelers are required by law to declare food, plant & animal products you bring with you into Canada. The CBSA website give examples of what must declared:

  • Live animals, animal products, such as cooked or raw meats, hides, skins, trophies, milk, fat butter, cheese, eggs, fish, seafood
  • Plant products, such as fruits, vegetables, seeds, nuts, trees, houseplants, wood (and wood products like furniture, carvings, bark), roots vines, herbs, flowers, insects, bulbs, soil

Note all fines and inadmissible goods are listed on the CBSA site. 

Common Mistakes: many travelers fail to declare items such as:

  • Hand made crafts, such as wooden items
  • Soil
  • Plants used for homeopathic or medicinal purposes
  • Fruits & vegetables.

“Travelers may not realize the hazards associated with food, plant and animal products. These products may carry invasive species and diseases and may cause risks to Canada’s food supply, economy, environment and our health.”